havasu falls grand canyon

The Magic Blue Waters of Havasu Falls

Few words stir the soul quite like “desert oasis.” And there is no desert oasis in the Southwest comparable to the legendary beauty of Havasu Falls inside the Grand Canyon. The waters of Havasu Creek plunge 90 feet through craggy red rocks into magical turquoise pools. Stands of green cottonwoods fill out the Eden-like desertscape. You simply will never find a more entrancing swimming hole, complete with an expansive beach.

 

Grand Canyons Havasupai Four Season GuidesHavasu Falls flows from a spring so unlike other desert waterfalls it puts on a reliable show all year round, although at times the curtain of water may break into dueling chutes. Nearby are additional hydrospectaculars such as Mooney Falls, 50 Foot Falls, “New” Navajo Falls and Beaver Falls.

 
As you might imagine, such a special place is not reached by parking your car at a trailhead and hiking half an hour. There are three main avenues for hiking into the Grand Canyon – the South Rim, the North Rim and, three hours to the west by vehicle, the trailhead to the Havasupai Indian Reservation. Havasupai translates to “people of the blue-green waters” and Havasu Falls resides on tribal land.

 

The oasis is sacred ground and environmentally fragile. As such, experiencing Havasu Falls requires permits, fees, reservations and strict adherence to local regulations. Then there is a switch-backing 1000-foot descent to the canyon floor, an eight-mile waterless desert trek through Hualapai Canyon to reach Supai Village and another two-mile hike to the campground near the falls. This is not a single-day adventure and three days are recommended for an excursion to Grand-Canyon-Havasu-Fallsthis special place.

 

Needless to say, the logistical and physical challenges can be daunting to first-timers; at Four Seasons we take care of everything: permitting, the gear, the food, cooking and cleaning, the transportation and the safety. Your only concern will be whether your camera is up to the challenge of capturing the surreal paradise of Havasu Falls.

 

1 Comment

  1. avatar
    Posted by Donna Lindquist| 03/09/2017 |Reply

    I am unable to walk that that well. I am 73 and love the Grand Canyon. Is there a way for a handicapped person to get there?

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